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This definition was slightly modified in 2005 in the WHO Bangkok Charter for health promotion in a globalized world to: This conference was primarily a response to the growing expectations of a new public health movement around the world. Discussions focused on needs in developed countries, but took into account similar concerns in all other regions. It built on the progress made through the Declaration on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata, the document “Goals of the World Health Organization for All” and the recent debate at the World Health Assembly on intersectoral action in the field of health. The Ottawa Charter is a global milestone in the field of health and remains an important reference for health promotion. The Charter identifies five components of health promotion measures and prerequisites for health, including peace, housing, education, food, income, a stable ecosystem, sustainable resources, social justice and justice. People from all walks of life are involved as individuals and as members of families and communities. Professional and social groups as well as health workers have a great responsibility to mediate between the different interests of society for the pursuit of health. Health promotion strategies and programmes should be tailored to the local needs and opportunities of each country and region in order to take into account different social, cultural and economic systems. Organizations that work in accordance with the principles of the Charter include: Health promotion is the process that allows people to increase their control and improve their health. Health is seen as a resource for everyday life, not as a goal of life.

Health promotion is not only the responsibility of the health sector, but goes beyond healthy lifestyles to achieve well-being. The basic conditions and resources needed for good health are as follows: Forward-looking care plans can help those close to you and those who care for you know what is important to you in terms of the level of health care and quality of life you want. Health promotion is the process that allows people to increase control over and improve their health. To achieve a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, an individual or group must be able to recognize and realize their aspirations, satisfy their needs, and change or cope with the environment. Health is therefore seen as a resource for everyday life, not as the purpose of life. Health is a positive concept that emphasizes social and personal resources as well as physical abilities. Therefore, health promotion is not only the responsibility of the health sector, but goes beyond healthy lifestyles to achieve well-being. There are laws that govern how health professionals may collect and store your health information and when they are authorized to share it.

World Health Organization (1986). Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Excerpt from the World Health Organization website: www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/previous/ottawa/en/ WHO has produced seven consensus documents on health promotion, the last in Nairobi in 2009. For more information, see Health Promotion Milestones and the 7th World Conference on Health Promotion. The thirtieth WHO World Health Assembly in 1977 stressed the importance of health promotion so that all international citizens have an “economically productive” level of health by the year 2000. In addition, a local European working group has developed a health promotion strategy in the WHO European Region. [Citation needed] Improving health requires a solid foundation under these basic conditions. The Ottawa Charter sets out three fundamental strategies for health promotion: Health conditions and opportunities cannot be ensured by the health sector alone. Most importantly, health promotion requires coordinated action by all stakeholders: governments, health and other social and economic sectors, non-governmental and voluntary organizations, local authorities, industry and the media.

People from all walks of life are involved as individuals, families and communities. Professional and social groups and health workers have a great responsibility in mediating between the different interests of society for the pursuit of health. The first International Conference on Health Promotion was held in Ottawa, Canada, in November 1986. The conference was first and foremost a response to the growing expectations of a new public health movement around the world. Discussions focused on the needs of developed countries, but took into account similar concerns in all other regions. The objective of the conference was to continue to identify measures to achieve the goals of the World Health Organization (WHO) up to the World Health Organization`s (WHO) “Health for All” initiative, which was launched in 1981. The Ottawa Conference was preceded in 1978 by the Alma Ata Conference on Primary Health Care, followed by other international conferences on health promotion in Adelaide (1988), Sundsvall (1991), Jakarta (1997), Mexico (2000), Bangkok (2005) and Nairobi (2009). Each conference continues to strengthen health promotion principles and practices, such as .B. healthy public policies, an enabling environment, building healthy alliances, and bridging the justice gap. The following information is taken from the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. The best-known definition of health promotion is that of the Ottawa Charter of the World Health Organization (1986): health promotion aims to achieve equal health equity […].

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